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6/19/2020

What does inclusive education looks like?

What does inclusive education looks like

Let’s finally invest our resources into public schools, as the first step towards comprehensive, inclusive education. Our children deserve to learn about their country’s history in a way that inspires them to build a better future.

Image description: In the background, a desk with school supplies. On the left, there are two piled books and a metallic pencil holder with a dozen pencils eraser-side up. On the far right, five stacked books and on the foreground a toy car with an apple on top and another metallic pencil holder with a dozen pencils sharp-side up. The image is presented in orange tones. The text reads: What does inclusive education look like?

Funding public schools is the first step to building comprehensive, inclusive education in Arizona.

We know teachers in Arizona are working two or three jobs to make ends meet. Our schools lack basic supplies such as copy paper and current books. Career politicians use Public Schools as just one more of their profit streams. With these challenges, it’s no wonder that our understanding of American History lacks inclusivity.

Let’s finally invest our resources into public schools, as the first step towards comprehensive, inclusive education. Our children deserve to learn about their country’s history in a way that inspires them to build a better future. Education programs that speak to each and every one of our students, which acknowledge and celebrate the journey of our diverse people, lead to equality in rights, equity in opportunities, and greater justice in everyday life.

Today, we celebrate Juneteenth, also known as Jubilee Day, Freedom Day, or Liberation Day. African-American people enslaved in Texas were not informed about the Emancipation Proclamation. Two and a half years later, on June 19th, 1865, Union Army General Gordon Granger announced the federal orders in Galveston, Texas.

African-American people dressed in their best clothes and went out to celebrate with food and music. Although the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was not ratified until December 6th of that year, Juneteenth is the day that we commemorate the liberation of our fellow Americans.

Why didn’t we learn this in school as kids? Why isn’t Juneteenth a nationally observed holiday? Why are we all playing catching up in learning about events that shaped the lives of so many? The answer is leadership. Representation matters.

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